Hook me up (cream)

Hook me up (cream)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 178 x 59 x 49cm

Hook me up (green/silver)

Hook me up (green/silver)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 194 x 93 x 75cm

Hook me up (magenta)

Hook me up (magenta)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 155 x 111 x 55cm

Hook me up (orange)

Hook me up (orange)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 183 x 124 x 87cm

Hook me up (red)

Hook me up (red)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 128 x 77 x 73cm

Hook me up (silver)

Hook me up (silver)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 156 x 70 x 61cm

Installation View

Installation View
Murray White Room, Melbourne.

Installation View

Installation View
Murray White Room, Melbourne

Installation View

Installation View
Murray White Room, Melbourne

Hook me up (cobalt)

Hook me up (cobalt)
2015, thermally formed acrylic and birch plywood, 113 x 78 x 60 cm

Hook  Me Up

At a garage sale I purchased a set of interlocking wooden hooks that are vertically installed. These hooks have a playful quality reminded me of a children’s game called “barrel of monkeys” where monkeys arms interlink in either symmetrical or asymmetrical pattern. Adapting the style of this hooking system, so that the acrylic could thread through the plywood hooks. Aided by gravity, the bends and curves of the acrylic locked the two components together. This series refers to human proportion and vertical-ness of the body. The palette is reduced to a single colour, so that the interaction of the two materials is apparent. An exception to this rational was (Orange Black Red) where it is constructed in a manner that is similar to the multi-coloured mobiles.

Like other acrylic projects, such as the Gertrude Edition, the drawing process precedes making. Lines are hand drawn in a loose and unedited style, similar to the process of automatic drawing. Differing from automatic drawing, by its purpose, which is to divide the rectangular sheet of the acrylic in organic and non-mathematical sections. This process of dividing a ‘standard’ sheet of acrylic uses the entire sheet by nesting of shapes in continuum. The forming process is unplanned and could be described as a physical maneuver of the acrylic material directed by scale and dimensions of my body. Sometimes sections are reformed and edited, other times forming it is straightforward and a once off action.